Through my eyes: walking through Hanoi, Vietnam

Melbourne’s been sweltering. And I’m not a summer person. I don’t like extreme heat or humidity.

Unless I’m in Vietnam…

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Parts of Hanoi are tourist-friendly “big city,” while other parts, like the produce markets, are still so simple and local. There’s such a huge mix of people – tourists and locals, students and manual labourers, restaurant workers and street food vendors, and they all somehow fit together in perfect harmony…

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Photo essay: The Temple of Literature, Hanoi, Vietnam

The Temple of Literature in Hanoi is dedicated to Confucius , and was the site of Vietnam’s first university, dating back to 1076. Back then, only those of noble birth were admitted, but the mid-1400s brought about a new age, where gifted students from around the country were allowed.

Stunning, breath taking, awe-inspiring… none of these quite do it justice, nor do my photos. But hopefully they’re enough to pique your interest and encourage a visit if you ever find yourself in Hanoi 🙂

 

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Through my eyes: waterside in Hoi An

So much happens by the water in Hoi An.

Boatmen and women chasing tourists down for a river ride.
Locals selling hammocks and fruit.
Children running around barefoot and giggling.
Slack-jawed tourists pointing their cameras in every which direction.
A few long fisherman and women throwing out and pulling in nets.
Lunch and cigarette breaks.
People rushing, people patiently waiting…

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Tea time: Trà Viêt Tea, Vietnam

Trà Viêt Tea
http://www.traviet.com/en/

I’m usually pretty consistent with my Monday morning blog posts, so big apologies for missing yesterday – unfortunately, being knocked out with a migraine most of Sunday wasn’t real conductive to blogging time! It did make for a good excuse to rest and drink tea, though, so I thought that’s what I’d post about this morning – my favourite green tea purchased from Vietnam 🙂 Someone asked me after I got back from Vietnam if I did much shopping and what I bought over there. When I told them I’d pretty much just bought a whole lot of tea, they looked a little perplexed; what they didn’t know was that tea has been my souvenir of choice for a few years now.

It’s incredible how making and sipping on a pot of tea you’ve made with tea leaves you bought in a market in Chicago or on the side of a street in Hoi An or at a cute little café in New York can bring all of those good holiday memories and feels flooding right back 🙂 So, when I spotted the little Trà Viêt tea stall set up on the street in Hoi An, I was like a moth to the flame.

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This lovely lady kindly let me choose a variety of tea to try, and took us through a little tea ceremony, demonstrating exactly how to brew the tea I’d chosen – a pandan ginseng green tea. Turns out that the best way to brew this particular one is to add the leaves into the pot, and fill with water at around 80°C (or, roughly 1 part cold water to 4 parts boiling). Pour the water out immediately, and refill the pot again, steeping the leaves for no more than a minute.

You get an utterly delicious green tea with that distinct pandan flavour (which I absolutely LOVE!) – it’s the perfect morning pot of tea, and I do try to make time most weekends to slow down and enjoy a pot (or two) before I get going – you can easily get two or three infusions from these leaves, too, which makes them even more perfect for me 🙂

Trà Viêt is quite popular in Vietnam, and sold all around the country; I’ve been trying to source a website that sells it online, too, and the closest I’ve been able to find is here, although they don’t ship everywhere… I plan to email Trà Viêt directly when I’m close to running out and checking if they can post me some more! Otherwise, another trip to Vietnam wouldn’t necessarily be a bad thing… If you have a visit coming up, though, I’d recommend a tea stop with them – they have a pretty big range, and you can always ask for a demonstration so you can learn the proper way to brew your tea

Eat here: Hoa Anh Dao Sakura Restaurant, Hoi An, Vietnam

Hoa Anh Dao Sakura Restaurant
119-121 Nguyễn Thái Học, Minh An, tp. Hội An
http://www.hoiansakura.com/

Back to Vietnam this morning, to one of the most brilliant restaurant experiences I’ve ever had. On the banks of Hoi An’s Thu Bon River stands a beautiful, golden building. It’s clearly been there for a while, with the peeling and faded yellow paint and those little signs of decay that make buildings like this look so perfect. I would have thought a building like this would house a crappy, touristy restaurant, with a Vietnamese-by-numbers menu and overpriced seafood, but the sight of that little terrace overlooking the river and street below was too much, and we decided to treat ourselves to a “fancy” dinner one night.

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Long story short, great decision. The service was amazing from the moment we stepped up past the entry threshold – the Vietnamese are so friendly and genuine, you never feel like an imposition or that they’re only being nice because they’re employed to do so. Seated up on the terrace, we had the perfect view. And the menu was phenomenal… We over-ordered, obviously, but really couldn’t help ourselves!

White rose dumplings topped with fried shallots and dipping sauce.
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Mixed appetizer platter.
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DIY rice paper rolls with grilled pork skewers, bahn cuon, and salad. We thankfully got a quick crash course in the proper way to layer and wrap these, and they were great!
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Duck salad. This was amazing! So fresh, perfect mid-meal palate cleanser, but it would have made a perfect meal on its own, too.
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Husband’s choice – beef noodles with veggies. He loved it.
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And my choice – prawns cooked in coconut milk. This was magic, pure and simple. The best seafood dish I have ever eaten, my goodness it was good!
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Plus a few beers for husband, and a few coconut waters for me, I think we paid around AUD$60.00 for all of that… we couldn’t believe it! The prices was ridiculously cheap for the amount and quality of the food we had, the view was the best in the city, the service was wonderful, and it was the perfect dinner experience. Don’t let appearances deceive you – add it to the list of places to eat at in Hoi An. And ask for a terrace table!

Travel art journal: Vietnam 2016 – tea time

Back to Vietnam again this fine Friday morning, through my travel journal and some of the tea stops we had. Any time it got too hot to keep walking around, or the few times I got too overwhelmed, we stopped for tea. Sometimes hot, sometimes ice cold, always comforting.

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Eating the city: Hanoi, Vietnam

Let’s eat our way through another city… let’s go to Hanoi  🙂

Bún chà
Every city does it a little differently, but its most popular in Hanoi. Places like this do an incredible spread of food – for only a few dollars, we got a pile of vermicelli, a bigger pile of fresh herbs, a big bowl of freshly fried spring rolls, a bowl each of broth and grilled meat, and fresh lime, garlic and chili. Just so much deliciousness! You can find this amazing place right here.

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Snake wine
You’re gonna see some weird stuff in Vietnam. And when you do, you have two choices: run away from it, or embrace it. When we sat down to down to a nice dinner and spied an enormous glass jar filled with what we guesed to be some type of rice wine, a few snakes and a chicken carcass, we figured “when in Rome…” And that’s how we came to drink Vietnamese rice wine infused with dead cobra and chicke

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Coconut jelly
There are some delicious desserts in Hanoi, especially in a lot of the little hole-in-the-wall family restaurants. My favourite was coconut jelly, especially ones like this with little coloured fruit and jelly bits in it.

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