Through my eyes: Bangkok street art

I was looking through some photos I have stored on our computer from our last trip to Thailand, in 2014, and came across this one…

Husband and I had been walking through the streets while the Shutdown Bangkok protests were in full swing. We were seeing people camped out on the road sides, simple food sold from the backs of motorbikes, and locals walking around in torn tshirts and bare feet.

Then, we turned a corner, and found this brightly coloured, fun, modern piece of art. In complete contrast to everything going on around it, and ee both just stopped and burst into laughter. That’s why I love Bangkok so much; you really never know what you’re going to stumble onto!

Top 5 Things To Do in Bangkok

1. Shop up an absolute storm at Chatuchak Weekend Market
http://www.chatuchak.org/
Where? Chatuchak Market is adjacent to the Kamphaengpecth Station (MRT) about 5 minute walk from Mochit Skytrain (BTS) Station and Suan Chatuchak (Chatuchak Park) Station (MRT)
Why go? Spanning 27 acres, it’s one of the biggest markets in the world. The atmosphere is electric, the food is great, and if you can’t find something you want to buy, it doesn’t exist.
How long will you need? At least half a day
Cost? Depends how much you plan to buy – make sure you barter, though!
Read more:
– Through my eyes: Bangkok’s Chatuchak Weekend Market

 

2. Eat up a storm on Soi 38

Where? right near BTS stop: Thonglor
Why go? Because it’s street food heaven. They all congregate there and the smell of it all is magic.
How long will you need? An hour or two
Cost? You’ll be able to get a great meal for only a few dollars – the pork and noodle dish above cost under AUD$4.00!
Read more:
– Street food heaven: Soi 38, Bangkok, Thailand

 

3. Then, learn to cook for yourself at BaiPai Cooking 

http://www.baipai.com/
Where? 8/91 Ngam Wongwan Road, Soi 54, Ladyao, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900
Why go? To learn to cook! The classes are fantastic, very hands on, and come with full recipes for you to take home. And once you’re done cooking in the class, you get to sit down with your classmates and eat it all!
How long will you need? A few hours, depending on your class time:
Morning Class – 09:30 – 13:30
Afternoon Class – 13:30 – 17:30
Cost? THB 2,2200 per person (around AUD$80.00)
Read more:
– Baipai Cooking School, Bangkok, Thailand

 

4. Take a boat down the river to the Wat Pho Temple complex

Where? Maharat Road, near the river. Take the Chao Phraya River Express to the Tha Thien Pier – it’ll cost under a dollar.
Why go? Because Bangkok is a crazy city, and this is the most beautiful little piece of paradise you could possibly hope to escape to 🙂
How long will you need? Half a day
Cost? Entry is THB 100 per person (around AUD$3.80)
Read more:
– Through my eyes: Wat Pho Temple Complex, Bangkok (part 1)
– Through my eyes: Wat Pho Temple Complex, Bangkok (part 2)

 

5. Take a stop off at Chinatown on the boat ride back to the city

Where? Take the Chao Phraya River Express back towards the city and stop at the Ratchawong Pier. From there, walk up Ratchawong Road to Sampaeng Lane, and Yaowarat Road (Chinatown’s main street).
Why go? This is the ultimate antidote to the peace and tranquility in the temples. Chaos is an understatement, the shopping is heavy on tacky souvenirs, but the food is great and the atmosphere is insane in the best possible way!
How long will you need? Add another few hours to your half day at the Wat Pho Temple Complex
Cost? Depends on your shopping habits!
Read more:
– Through my eyes: Bangkok’s Chinatown, Thailand

 

Through my eyes: Elephant trekking in Chalong, Phuket

Happy hump day everyone! We were in Italy yesterday; today we’re crossing the globe and heading to Thailand 🙂 I’ve made it to this beautiful country three times now, and would gladly go back again tomorrow, especially to hang out with these guys again…

It is truly incredible just how quietly and softly these enormous, gentle giants tread. I don’t know what I was expecting, and it’s not that I noticed any noise, but it was the silence and quiet that really hit me. I’m traipsing through the mountains of the Chalong region in Phuket, Thailand, and I can barely hear a sound…

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The only real noise was the mahout occasionally leaning down and whispering in a sing-song voice into his elephant’s ear, which seemed to get the desired response each time; each time he pulled himself upright, he was smiling serenely to himself, and the elephant continued to dance along with surprising grace.

Eat here: the little pink Pad Thai cart on Patong Beach, Phuket, Thailand

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So this is a ridiculous story. I went to Thailand for the first time a few years ago with my best friend, E (who I had lunch with on the weekend at Sookie La La, which I’ll write about a little later this week when my motivation levels are low and brunch cravings are high). Our accommodation was down the south end of Patong Beach, and on our first day there, we walked along the street parallel with the beach for a while to get our bearings. We found this little, bright pink food cart around lunch time, with a pair silently firing out the most incredible smelling dishes. Stomachs grumbling, we stopped to check out the menu, and decided to order ourselves a seafood pad thai each. It was probably the best pad thai I’ve ever eaten – fresh like you wouldn’t believe, cooked up right under our noses, under a flurry of hands and sauce bottles and woks and noodles. It was a very fond food memory from our time there…

When I went back to visit Phuket again early last year with husband, I told him all about this fantastic little food cart that we ate at numerous times during my last trip. We walked up the beach to the spot I thought I remembered it being, on a snowball’s chance in hell it might still be around. No such luck 😦 We walked a little further, until the sun started to get a bit too strong, and decided to double back and find a spot on the beach to leave our stuff so we could go for a swim. What happened next, I still don’t believe, and if husband hadn’t been there as my witness, no one else would either… Dead set, as we walked back past the spot where I remembered the food cart being parked, it drove up onto the side walk, turned around into the same spot, and officially opened for lunchtime business!!!! I actually literally stopped in my tracks and sat down on the nearest block of concrete to make sure it wasn’t just a heat and hunger induced hallucination… Husband didn’t waste any time – he ran straight over and ordered 2 serves of pad thai (good man).

While a little spicier than last time I had it, it was every bit still as delicious, and I do believe it was the same people working the wok, much to my disbelief! I was beyond stoked to have been able to find and repeat this food experience, and even happier to find it was still as delicious as I’d remembered it! That meal, to me, is perfect, and what travel is all about – cheap and delicious food ordered off a menu by pointing to pictures in lieu of English descriptions, served by real people and being eaten by locals as well as tourists, on the side of a road with my feet in the sand. That’s what travel and experiencing it all is about. That’s real. Has anyone else been to Phuket’s Patong Beach and seen these guys??!

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Eat & shop here: The Chaweng Walking Street Market, Koh Samui, Thailand

First of September; first day of spring, first day waking up to brilliant, bright sunshine in a while this morning! And this morning as I’m sitting on the train to work writing this post, I’m thinking of Thailand… It’s been a long winter, which I usually enjoy, but the throat infection that’s had me knocked on my ass for the past 2 weeks has been making wish for warmer climates and lazy days spent doing something other than “resting” and “getting better”…

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Chaweng Walking Street Market
South Chaweng, just off the main street
Koh Samui, Thailand

Yes, I realise those aren’t particularly amazing directions or an exact address, but we’re talking about Thailand here. The Chaweng area isn’t that big, so all you need to do is ask someone to point you in the right direction! When husband and I visited early 2014, we didn’t realise that the action all happened at night time there, with the night market being pretty popular with both tourists and locals alike. We saw “market” marked on a map we picked up and the airport and made our way over around lunch time one day; one single vendor was open, so we ordered lunch there, and it was probably the best pad thai I’ve ever eaten…

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In fact, the food was so good that we returned later that night, and the night after that! The little stall made some incredible food; other than the pad that, the other favourite was the spring rolls, hand made fresh daily by someone’s cousin. Or maybe it was someone’s aunt. I can’t remember. Doesn’t matter though, they were delicious either way!

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The Walking Street completely comes to life at night though, after around 5.30pm, so make sure you visit on an empty stomach and ready to shop your way around in between food and cocktails!

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10 Delicious Things To Eat In Thailand

I wrote this article last week for Outlet Magazine, and enjoyed writing it so much (it brought back so many great memories!) that I thought I’d share it here, too 🙂 Thailand has been relatively quiet in the world news since the Shutdown Bangkok movement of January 2014 that we somehow managed to get caught up in; that is, until the bombings in the country’s capital last week. For a country that makes a great portion of its living from tourism, this is a huge blow to the already struggling economy, which actually really upset me; for the most part, they’re good people who are working hard to make better lives for themselves. To be attacked like that is just cruel, it’s really really hard to hear about, especially when it’s Bangkok – the city gets a shitty wrap, but it’s still one of my favourite places! But, like I said when I wrote about the Shutdown thing, there are still so many great reasons to visit Thailand! Think cheap cocktails and beer, endless shopping, bustling markets and (best of all) some of the best food in the world. When things settle down and we’re all ready to head over to spend up on handbags and food, here are ten of the best things to eat.

 

  1. Anything on a stick
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    Chances are if it’s edible meat of any description, you’ll find it in Thailand threaded onto a skewer and grilled. Chicken, beef, pork, seafood, whatever – it’s all fair game, and it’s always delicious. Extra delicious if you can find honey marinated grilled pork skewers, those are the best.
  1. Noodles with wontons
    Photograph © Jess Carey 2014
    There’s a pretty noticeable Chinese influence in Thailand, and you can see it in a lot of the food. Fresh noodles with BBQ pork and wontons are one of those dishes that allows the Chinese influence to sneak in, but it’s so good no one seems to mind.
  1. Satay chicken skewers
    Photograph © Jess Carey 2014
    This is a simple dish, but a huge street food favourite. Grilled chicken on a stick with flavourful, delicious satay sauce. Really good option on the way home from a big night on Bangla Road.
  1. Freshly grilled seafood
    Thai food 4
    Find a decent seafood restaurant (look for somewhere super busy), pick out your dinner from the monster crustaceans displayed on ice out the front, ask to have them grilled and go with a simple butter garlic sauce on the side. Amazing!
  1. Pork fried rice
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    Another dish with a Chinese influence, fried rice is always a classic. It’s a great one to order from the street food vendors at night, particularly if you’re looking for something a bit more comforting and familiar.
  1. Nutella crepes
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    Every bit as good as the Parisian stuff. Actually, they’re better here, because more often than not, your Nutella and strawberry stuffed crepe will be doused in condensed milk before it’s served up to you. If that sounds unappealing to you, it’s only because you haven’t had one after a few cheap cocktails at 1am. You should try it.
  1. Pad Thai
    Thai food 7
    Duh – can’t well go to Thailand without eating Pad Thai!! Skip the tacky Westernised restaurants and head straight to the street food vendors; that’s where the best stuff comes from. Grab a fresh coconut to drink from while you’re at it – absolute winning combination.
  1. Fresh fruit smoothies
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    These little stalls are set up absolutely everywhere and are the best way to feel better about your holiday food intake. Fresh mangos, strawberries, watermelon and pineapples all blended with ice into a cool, thick cup of healthy deliciousness. They also double up as great happy hour options if you buy your own liqueur at one of the infinite 7/11s floating around 😉
  1. Coconut sticky rice with fresh mango
    Photograph © Jess Carey 2014
    Another Thai classic – thick, sticky, coconut rice topped with sweet, fresh mango. It’s one of those dishes you don’t even need to be hungry to eat – it’s just soooo good!
  1. Coconut ice cream
    Thai food 10
    Yeah, they like their coconut over there. And when it’s so delicious and fresh, you can’t blame them for coming up with so many ways to use it. Freshly churned coconut ice cream at the end of a hot day is complete perfection. And because it’s technically made from fruit, you can eat as much as you like without feeling guilty! Everyone wins!

Sunday dreaming… Old Fisherman’s Village Night Market, Koh Samui, Thailand

Old Fisherman’s Village Night Market

Koh Samui, Thailand

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I can’t remember how this came up, but husband and I were reminiscing about some of the best markets we’ve visited on our travels, and this one was close to the top of both our lists. If you find yourself in the very fortunate position of being in Koh Samui on a Friday night, do yourself a HUGE favour and hail a tuk tuk, and ask your driver to take you to the Old Fisherman’s Village Night Market. They won’t need an address, just that name. If you’re staying somewhere along Chaweng Beach like most visitors to Koh Samui do, you’ll find it a pretty quick 10 – 15 minute ride away, in the Bophut area of the island, and it’s the absolute best way to spend a night!

The market is incredible, full of the best street food on the island, which you’ll be wanting to wash down with a freshly mixed cocktail, which you can sip on while you’re shopping for little trinkets and souvenirs. There’s occasionally live music and heaps of little bars and restaurants you can stop at if the heat and crowds get a bit too much to deal with, as well as super easy access to tuk tuks when you’re done and ready to head back to your hotel. Remember to bring cash (notes in smaller denominations will serve you best), comfy walking shoes, and an appetite to try some strange but delicious stuff you might not ordinarily see on the restaurant menus!

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