Cook this: quick & healthy – citrus & coriander snapper on baked corn & pineapple rice (gluten free/low FODMAP)

After our crazy busy Saturday of Christmas shopping, normal people would have spent Sunday chilling out. But we’re not normal people; we’re idiots. After crawling into bed just before midnight, we set the alarm for 7am so we could get a work out in before heading back to the shopping centres to find some Christmas decorations for the tree and the house. The alarm went off, we both groaned and rolled around not wanting to move too far, but we dragged ourselves out of bed anyway. We decided to make it a big walk with Marley so he could get his walk in too, and so we could enjoy the sunshine while it was out. We laughed at the idea that normal people wouldn’t be doing this to themselves – normal people would be sleeping in on a Sunday, enjoying a lazy breaky, making no concrete commitments to doing anything much. But there we were.

On reflection, the pursuit of being fit and healthy has always been there for me. I always checked out magazine articles that had the little workout tips or healthy eating ideas in them. I researched exercise plans online when we got the internet (around when I started high school). I studied calorie counts when the Calorie King website got popular. Despite the fact that I’ve always been at a healthy weight, my family has always been healthy, we were never fed anything but fruit and veggies and home cooked, balanced meals as kids (thanks, mum!), and none of us have ever been close to overweight, it’s always been a bit of a preoccupation of mine. I guess that’s why setting my alarm for 7am on a Sunday to exercise doesn’t really strike me as odd. As kids, we were always active. Basketball training, tennis lessons, dance classes, taekwondo. Whatever it was, it wasn’t questioned. Time to go to basketball? Sweet, let’s go. There was never the option of “nah, I can’t be bothered, I’d rather sleep in, play video games for 3 hours and eat 4 bags of chips while I’m doing it.” We just got on with it.

So, we got up, we got moving, we got a little overenthusiastic and may or may not have started decorating the house in red and green already… But at the end of it all, we still needed dinner. It needed to be quick, healthy, nothing too heavy, fructose free, and use the snapper fillets we’d bought at the market on Friday night. I have a few notebooks in the kitchen with recipes I’ve cut out of magazines and collected over the years – in  the one with the seafood recipes in it, I found a recipe from an old Women’s Health magazine from years ago, and it looked just about perfect. As usual, I messed about with it to make it more tummy friendly and quick and simple, so here’s my take on their Costa Rican snapper!

Ingredients (makes 4 serves):
– juice of 1 small orange
– juice of half a lemon or lime
– 2 tbsp oil (I used garlic infused oil)
– 1 clove garlic minced (leave it out if you’re a low FODMAPper)
– 4 tbsp fresh coriander, finely chopped
– 1 tsp caster sugar
– salt and pepper
– 4 snapper fillets, approx 120g each
– 2 cups cooked brown rice
– 2 green capsicums, diced
– 1 ear of corn kernels
– small tin diced pineapple
– 2 tomatoes, diced

Method:
1. Combine the orange and lemon or lime juices, the oil, garlic, coriander, sugar and a little salt and pepper in a large tub. Add the fish fillets and shake the tub to coat well. Marinate for 15 minutes.

2. Pre-heat the oven to 200°C and grab a large baking dish out.

3. In a large bowl, combine the rice, green capsicum, corn kernels and pineapple (I left the pineapple out because husband and I both like cold pineapple more than having it warmed up, but you can go either way), and spread it over the baking dish.

4. Lay the fish fillets on top of the rice and spoon the rest of the marinating mixture over the top.

5. Bake for 20 – 25 minutes, until the rice is cooked through – serve fresh out of the oven with fresh diced tomatoes (and the pineapple if you didn’t put it in the rice).

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Cook this: mini meatloaf with roast veggies (gluten free, low FODMAP)

Know what really sucks? When you’re sick and can’t eat your usual “sick day” food. You know what I’m talking about? That thing you make every time you’re really, really feeling crap – the only thing you can stomach, the one plate of food you know will make you feel a little better. Mine is a bowl of pasta (preferably penne or spirals) with a little melted butter and salt. That’s what my grandmothers used to make me when I was sick as a little person, and that’s what I still crave, even now. Just plain, boiled pasta, with a bit of melted butter. Stupid low FODMAP crap won’t allow it, though (ohh gluten, my good friend, can’t wait to get you back in my life!), so I’m suffering through this stupid bloody flu without it.

That’s ok though – a few weeks ago, I found this amazing recipe for a FODMAP friendly meatloaf on Strands Of My Life – I played around with it a little and now have a back up, sick day, winter comfort food dish – happy days! It’s not a gourmet dinner (we take advantage of tinned tomato soup here), but it is warm and comforting, and, more importantly (particularly when you’re sick), it’s quick and easy. It also makes for pretty good left overs, and you can mess around with the herbs and spices as much as you want to get whatever flavour you feel like. So, here’s how we do mini meat loaves with roast veggies for winter-flu-feel-like-crap dinner!

Ingredients (makes 4)
– 2 slices gluten free bread (or a cup of oats if you don’t have any bread)
– 1 tbsp paprika (I like the sweet smokey stuff)
– 1 tbsp dried basil
– 1 tbsp dried oregano
– salt & pepper
– small handful of freshly grated parmesan cheese
– 1 egg, lightly whisked
– 300g beef mince
– 300g pork mince
– oil (any is fine, but my preference is garlic infused olive oil, to give it all a bit more flavour, seeing as I can’t actually use onion or garlic in the meatloaf)
– 2 tins tomato soup (just check the ingredients – don’t want any FODMAPs in there, and gluten, lactose, onion or garlic are the usual offenders)
– veggies of choice to roast (I like zucchini and eggplant)

 

 Method
1. Put the bread (or oats), herbs, spices and cheese into a food processor, and process until crumbs form. Also, now is a good time to pre-heat the oven for your veggies.

2. Pour the crumbs into a large bowl, add the egg and meat, and mix together well with your hands, then shape the meat into 4 small loaves.

3. Heat a large pot over medium heat with a little oil, and brown off the loaves until they all have a nice, golden brown crust.

4. Reduce the heat to low and add the tomato soup. Place the lid on the pot and simmer for 20-25 minutes, until cooked through – it’s a good idea to turn the meat loaves every now and then so they cook evenly.

5. While the meat loaves are cooking, get the veggies into the oven to roast, as well.

6. Serve up your mini loaves with roast veggies and the tomato soup poured over them.

 

P.S. apologies for the poor quality of photos – they were just still too hot and steamy, and I wanted to dig in and eat before they cooled down hehe

Cook this: Zucchini chocolate chip cake (gluten/lactose free, low FODMAP)

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Last week I posted a bit of an educational post, after getting some test results that led me to a low FODMAP diet for the next few weeks. As a result, I’ve been getting creative in the kitchen, with surprisingly good results thus far (for those of you who are also FODMAP challenged, I’ll keep posting recipes that’ll hopefully make your lives easier as well!), but the daily scroll through my favourite blogs proves to be difficult reading. My sweet tooth is screaming for the pretty, sugary cakes and cookies I see, the gluten laden pastries and lactose heavy ice creams. But they’re all deal breakers at the moment, so the creativity continues; I can’t go without my bit of cake with my tea, so I’m making things FODMAP friendly instead! Instead of whinging about what I can’t have, I’ve just gotta work with what I can have!

About a fortnight ago, I saw this recipe as made by Sophie at Cooking Trips, who in turn took her cue from Levana at Levana’s Whole Foods Kitchen. While both their recipes looked lovely (with Levana suggesting the additions of walnuts or pecans for a nutty crunch, and Sophie going with pine nuts), I, as usual, had my own ideas. I needed to make my cake FODMAP friendly – that meant a gluten, lactose, fructose, etc free version. I was fortunate in finding a pretty decent gluten free flour at the Preston Market, and decided to try a gluten free flour/almond meal mix in lieu of regular flour. I also recently found out that Lindt 85% dark chocolate is lactose free (yay!) and that a small amount of sunflower seeds is ok.

Long story short; I made the changes I needed to make, and it turned out AMAZINGLY, perfectly, spectacularly well! I wasn’t honestly expecting amazing things from a gluten free, low FODMAP cake, but holy wow it was good! It’s one of my least favourite words, but “moist” would be one of the more appropriate ways to describe this cake. It was sweet, but not overpoweringly so, with the dark chocolate pairing up perfectly with the zucchini (I’d always heard they went well together in cakes, but had somehow never tried it), and the almond meal held the moisture of the zucchini really well, with the gluten free flour giving it a bit more of a typical cake-like texture.

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You shouldn’t need to know much more – it’s a delicious low FODMAP cake, it has chocolate which is delicious, zucchini which basically makes it a health food option, and it doesn’t taste like crap, which you’d probably expect. Go buy a zucchini and get baking!

Ingredients (makes one loaf):
– 1 large or 2 small zucchinis
– 3 large eggs, at room temperature
– 2 tbsp lactose free milk (I used Zymil)
– 2 tbsp vegetable oil
– finely grated zest of one small orange
– 1 cup almond meal
– 1½ cups gluten free flour, double sifted
– 1 tsp baking powder
– ⅓ cup caster sugar
– heaped ⅓ cup sunflower seeds
– 1/2 cup dark chocolate chips or roughly chopped Lindt 85% dark chocolate

Method:
1. Pre-heat the oven to 160°C and grease a loaf tin with butter. Grate the zucchini into a large strainer or colander, and set aside while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

2. In a large bowl, lightly whisk together the eggs, milk, vegetable oil and orange zest, then set aside.

3. In another bowl, combine the rest of the ingredients and mix together well to blend and combine.

4. Go back to the zucchini, and taking one handful at a time, squeeze out some of the excess moisture (don’t squeeze it dry, but you also don’t want it sopping wet), and mix it into the egg mixture.

5. Add about a third of the dry mixture into the wet mixture, and stir to combine. Add another third and stir again, then finally the remainder and again stir to completely combine.

6. Pour the mixture into the greased loaf tin and bake 60min, or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean.

7. Allow the cake to cool down to room temperature in the tin, slice and enjoy! Should keep for 3 – 4 days in an air-tight container.

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A crash course in FODMAPs & cook this: poached egg in polenta & sugo

So, it’s been a frustrating year thus far, trying to work out what’s causing my stomach to hate me so much. After recently undergoing some blood tests and hydrogen breath tests, turns out we can confirm now that I’m not coeliac (although large amounts of gluten don’t really agree with me),  but I am lactose and fructose intolerant, which is apparently why my stomach has been hating me so much. Great. So what does that mean? A super exciting low FODMAP diet for the next few weeks, after which we try to reintroduce some of the stuff that’s currently a no-go. I won’t bore you with the details (Google “low FODMAPs” for more detailed info), but basically FODMAPs are molecules found in a lot of common foods we eat that aren’t digested properly, and then cause nasty digestive issues.  FODMAP stands for:
Fermentable
Oligosaccharides (eg. Fructans and Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS))
Disaccharides (eg. Lactose)
Monosaccharides (eg. excess Fructose)
and
Polyols (eg. Sorbitol, Mannitol, Maltitol, Xylitol and Isomalt)

Great, but what the hell does that mean in real life? Basically, foods containing those guys are not my friend for the next few weeks. Not a whole lot of Ben & Jerry’s style shenanigans over the next few weeks, then…

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The OK to eat list includes:
GRAINS – gluten free everything – bread, pasta, flour etc, quinoa, rice, rice noodles, tapioca, corn thins, popcorn (yay!), oats (double yay!), polenta
VEGGIES – among a few others, red capsicums, bok choy, carrots, cucumber, zucchini, eggplant, ginger, tomato, lettuce, olives, parsnip, potato, spinach, the green tops of spring onions only
FRUITS – kiwi fruit, strawberries, oranges, pineapples, blueberries, rockmelon, limes, lemons, mandarins, passionfruit
DAIRY – lactose free milk and yoghurt (Liddell’s for me!), coconut milk, feta, mozzarella, Swiss, parmesan, brie, camembert cheeses
PROTEIN – chicken, beef, lamb, pork, fish, eggs, unprocessed meats
NUTS/SEEDS – anything but cashews and almonds really, in very small amounts (10 nuts or less)
OTHER – pure maple syrup, pure sugar/sucrose, dark chocolate (Lindt 85% for me!), raw cacao, salt/pepper, most oils, peanut butter, unsweetened coconut, herbs like cumin, paprika, coriander, basil, thyme, chives, parsley, rosemary, Nuttelex spread, small amounts of soy, fish and oyster sauces, some mayo/mustard (providing they don’t have any onion or garlic in the ingredients), tea (THANK GOD!), Massell stock cubes made without onion/garlic (SO happy I found these!)

Basically, not a heap of sauces/condiments/packaged stuff where the nasties are hidden – more plainly prepared stuff like grilled prawns (minus the garlic butter, unfortunately!), rice and simple steamed veggies. I’d be way happier in Thailand or Vietnam for the next 8 weeks, actually…

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The not OK to eat list includes:
GRAINS – Gluten – regular bread and pasta, cous cous, barley, and pretty much all pre-packaged cakes, biscuits, crackers, pastries etc.
VEGGIES – garlic, onion, broccoli, cabbage, snow peas, mushrooms, cauliflower, celery, fennel, leeks
FRUITS – apples, pears, stone fruits, tinned fruit, concentrated fruit juices, dried fruits
DAIRY – cow’s milk, lactose products, buttermilk, ice cream, custard, cream, cream cheese, cottage cheese, ricotta, sour cream
PROTEIN – sausages/processed meats (often have fructose products such as honey used in them, so check the ingredients!), all beans (kidney beans, black beans, etc), chickpeas, lentils, soy beans
NUTS/SEEDS – cashews, pistachios, large amounts of any other nuts/seeds
OTHER – honey, milk chocolate, molasses, regular stock cubes, relish, cocoa powder, teas that have fennel, dandelion or chamomile in them,  and anything that includes fructose, isomalt, high fructose corn syrup, maltitol, mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol and sugar free drinks and sweets that have polyols (ingredients typically ending in -yol) in them…. how the hell I’m going to study nutritional labels for all this crap is beyond me…

Grey areas:
– Soy and almond milk are the ones that’ll impact me most – almonds and soy beans are technically on the NOT OK section for the low FODMAP diet, but I’m figuring a little soy milk in my tea will still be better that regular milk! Otherwise I’ll stick with Zymil milk I think. Tofu is another one on the maybe/maybe not list, for the same reason.
– In terms of veggies, broccoli, avocado, sweet potato, pumpkin and corn – small serves of a half cup or less are thought to maybe be ok, but no conclusive evidence is available at this stage either way.

Without going into too much detail, it’s not a life sentence; generally after 8 – 10 weeks of this, you’re encouraged to start re-introducing some of those FODMAPs, group by group, to see if you can include them into your diet again 🙂 What that means here is that you won’t be seeing a heap of my standard delicious naughty food on here (I’m not saying I may not have the occasional slip up – I’ll do my best but I am only human!), but instead some more gluten free, lactose free, fructose free, FODMAP friendly options for a few weeks! And I have no intention of eating chicken and rice every day for the next 2 months, so we’ll see how creative this can get!

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ANYWAY, enough of the education component of this post (I didn’t want to get into it too much, but I also didn’t want you guys to be wondering why there wasn’t a new burger every week on here!), let’s get to the food – gooey, runny yolked poached egg in a polenta and chunky sugo nest. Winter time comfort food. The perfect meal to end the week. Which I really, really needed last night after only 3 hours sleep Saturday night.

The polenta and sugo were pretty simple – I make them both pretty often. But, surprisingly, I’ve never done poached eggs before! How is this possible?! I have no idea! It really only just hit me when I vetoed frying the egg and couldn’t be bothered waiting long enough to do the baked egg thing. I figured it couldn’t hurt to give it a try,  and happily, it was no where near as difficult or scary as I thought it’d be!

So here’s your gluten free, lactose free, fructose free, low FODMAP, tummy friendly, blah blah blah winter warmer dinner of poached egg/s, polenta and sugo…

Ingredients (for 2):
Sugo:
– garlic infused olive oil
– 2 rashers bacon, diced
– 1 red capsicum, diced
– 2 heaped tbsp pitted, sliced black olives
– 3 ripe tomatoes, diced
– 1 cup plain tomato pasta sauce
– salt, pepper and dried basil
– 2 handfuls baby spinach leaves, torn

Polenta:
– 2 cups water with a sprinkle of salt
– ½ cup polenta/fine semolina
– 1 tbsp Nuttelex spread (or just regular butter if you’re not low FODMAPing)
– 1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese

Eggs:
– as many eggs as you want
– pot of water
– 1 tbsp vinegar

Method:
1. Get the sugo started first – heat the oil in a pan over medium heat and add the bacon. Once the bacon starts to get a little colour, add the capsicum and cook over high heat until the capsicum starts to soften.

2. Next, add the olives, tomato, pasta sauce and as much salt, pepper and basil as you like to the pot. Simmer for 10 minutes, until the sauce thickens. Then mix the spinach through until it wilts and shrinks. You can set the sauce aside and re-heat it if need be just before serving.

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3. Get your pot of water and the little bit of vinegar for the eggs on the boil next – it needs to be a roaring, rolling boil before you even think about throwing those eggs in there. Crack as many eggs as you want into separate, small dishes and set them aside.

4. Finally, get the pot of water for the polenta on medium heat – bring it almost to the boil, turn the heat down and slowly add the polenta, whisking as you add it (if you dump it all in at once, it’ll be a lumpy mess). Once all the polenta is in, keep the heat on low and whisk continuously for 5-10 minutes, until you’re happy with the consistency – if it’s too thin for you, keep whisking over low heat to thicken it up, and if it’s too thick add a little more water. Add in the butter and cheese, whisk through, and again leave it to the side to re-heat if you need to before serving.

5. Now, those eggs. Water’s on a strong rolling boil, give it a stir with a spoon to create a little whirlpool in the centre, and slowly and carefully slide in the first egg. Set a timer for 2 minutes, try not to panic like I did at the messy trail of egg white that’s probably floating around in there (I don’t know how, but egg magic will bring it all together in the end), and remove your egg with a slotted spoon just before the timer hits the 2 minute mark – rest it on a paper towel-covered plate until you’re ready for it. Keep poaching your remaining eggs, one at a time.

6. Assembly is easy – polenta into the bowl first, lots of sugo next, and plonk your egg on top. Hopefully you saved a little parmesan to top it with, too! Enjoy 🙂

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And if there are any more low FODMAPers out there reading this, I’d LOVE to hear from you guys – let me know how you’re going with it all, any favourite dishes you have, any helpful tips and what not!

Cook this: Cake drops V.2 – the Jaffa edition (orange, polenta & cacao)

polenta cake drops 2

So, last week I posted a recipe for “superfood” cake drops, made with goji berries, cacao nibs and chia seeds, the inspiration for which came from Heather at Skinny Fat Girl. Anyway, over the week, I was thinking about other ways I could play around with this versatile little recipe, and make it more my own. One of my all time favourite sweet combinations is orange and polenta (looove orange and polenta cookies!), and I’m obviously a chocoholic (thanks, dad), so I decided to combine the lot to give it a bit of a Jaffa spin – while I absolutely cannot stand Jaffa lollies, with their crappy quality chocolate and rancid imitation orange flavouring, I absolutely love the combination of REAL orange and REAL chocolate!

polenta cake drops 1

Ingredients
– ¼ cup plain flour (gluten free if needed)
– ¼ cup almond meal (if you don’t have this lying around/don’t want to buy it, just use another quarter cup of flour instead)
– ½ cup polenta
– 1 tsp bicarb soda
– ¼ cup caster sugar (alternatively, honey for refined sugar free version, maple syrup for FODMAP friendly version, or Stevia or similar for lower calorie version)
– 125g yogurt (I like Liddells lactose free plain vanilla, but if you’re not lactose intolerant, plain, natural Greek yogurt is perfect)
– 1 tsp vanilla extract
– 1 tbsp freshly squeezed orange juice
– 1 egg white
– 2 tbsp toasted cacao nibs
– finely grated rind of 1 orange

Method
1. Preheat to 180ºC.
2. Combine the flour and/or almond meal, polenta, bicarb and sugar in a large bowl, then stir through the yoghurt, vanilla extract, orange juice and egg white until completely combined.
3. Stir in the cacao nibs and orange rind, until they’re evenly mixed through.
4. Baking option 1: scoop out tablespoons of batter onto a lined oven tray.
Baking option 2: scoop batter into mini muffin tins, either lightly spraying the tins first with a neutral cooking oil, or lining them with mini cupcake cases.
5. Bake for 10 minutes, or until just golden on top. Once cooled, these can be stored for almost a week in an airtight container

Just like the original “superfood” cake drops, these are light and airy, moist and delicious. And because they’re so quick and easy to make, come from all pantry staples, and can be made to be so tummy friendly, they’re now basically a staple in our house!  polenta cake drops 3

Cook this: Cornbread pudding

I found this recipe while on The Culinesstress’ site last week, and the gorgeous photo caught my eye pretty quickly. I read on to find a pretty simple recipe, and thought I’d give it a go, too – it seemed a really great winter-warmer type dish.

I haven’t really messed around with this recipe as much as I usually would – I actually had most of the ingredients in my pantry already other than fresh corn, which only cost $1 per ear at the market. The great thing about this recipe, other than it’s simplicity and the fact that it’s actually not terribly unhealthy, is the fact that it’s already gluten free, can be made lactose free, and as well as being low FODMAP friendly (by using only the green tops of the spring onions). So here’s how we do…

 

Ingredients (serves 2)
– butter, to grease tin with, and to serve (optional)
– 1¾ cups corn kernels, fresh if possible
– 4 tbsp thinly sliced spring onions
– 2 eggs
– ½ cup milk
– ½ cup loosely packed grated parmesan cheese
– salt (optional)
– 4 tablespoons cornmeal (polenta)

 

Method:
1. Pre-heat the oven to 180°C  and grease two small baking dishes or larger ramekins with butter – I know the proper ‘Murican way to do cornbread is in a case iron skillet, but sadly I didn’t have any of those lying around…

2. Mix together ¾ cup of corn kernels and the spring onion, and set aside.

3. Throw the remaining 1 cup of corn along with the eggs, milk, cheese (if you’re like me, reserve a little of the cheese to sprinkle over the top at the end before baking!) and cornmeal into a food processor or blender, and blend until it a smooth batter just comes together – be careful not to over mix! You can add a little salt here too, if you want – the parmesan may make it salty enough for you anyway, or if you’re like me, you may want a little more, because salty food is delicious.

4. Pour the blended batter into the pie tins and mix in the corn/spring onion mix, diving evenly between the two tins. If you saved some cheese from step 1, now would be the time to sprinkle it on top, before it goes into the oven.

5. Bake corn pudding at for 30 minutes, until cooked through and golden brown on top. Optionally, serve with a dollop of butter and sprinkle of salt on top.

It’s soft, surprisingly light and full of flavour, real winter comfort food 🙂 If you’re also enjoying the Melbourne cold at the moment, think about this for a quick, warming dinner this week!

Cook this: cacao, goji & chia cake drops (gluten & lactose free)

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A while ago I posted a recipe reluctantly titled “bliss balls;” I say reluctantly because I hate the fitness industry buzzwords and phrases, like “bliss balls.” I also really hate “super foods” but these cake drops are essentially full of them. But I can’t quite bring myself to calling them “super food cake drops” because it just sounds so bloody preachy and floggy.

Anyway, food. I saw a delicious looking recipe for Greek Yoghurt Blueberry Cookies from Heather at Skinny Fat Girl not long ago, and I was excited about it for a number of reasons:
1. Could be made gluten free
2. Could be made lactose free
3. Could be made low FODMAP friendly (I’m going through the whole breath testing crap at the moment to investigate the stomach issues further, stay tuned for more…)
4. Could be easily customised
5. Could be legitimately justified as a healthy treat because:
— cacao nibs: full of antioxidants & magnesium
— goji berries: high in Vitamin C and a natural anti inflammatory
— chia seeds: literally all of the nutrients – fiber, protein, good fats, calcium, magnesium, all of the good stuff

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So with Heather’s recipe in hand, I stuffed around with it, as usual, and here’s how we do…

Ingredients
– 1 cup flour – depending on your dietary requirements, you can use pretty much anything – plain flour, gluten free flour, almond meal, oat flour, or a combination. I love using a 25% flour, 75% almond meal ratio. Another option that I’m looking forward to trying is to replace part of the flour with protein powder – I’m hooked on NuZest chocolate protein at the moment!
– 1 tsp bicarb soda
– ¼ cup caster sugar – if you wanna go refined sugar free, substitute with honey. You could also use maple syrup for FODMAP friendliness (which I would have but I didn’t have any in the pantry). If you’re keeping track of calories, substitute for Stevia or similar sweetener.
– 125g yogurt – I used Liddells lactose free plain vanilla, but if you’re not lactose intolerant, Chobani natural Greek yogurt is fantastic for this, too
– 2 tsp vanilla extract
– 1 egg white
– 2 tbsp toasted cacao nibs
– 2 tbsp goji berries
– 1 tbsp chia seeds

Instructions
1. Preheat to 180ºC.
2. Combine the flour, bicarb and sugar in a large bowl, then stir through the yoghurt, vanilla and egg white until completely combined.
3. Stir in the goji berries, cacao nibs and chia seeds, until they’re evenly mixed through.
4. Baking option 1: scoop out tablespoons of batter onto a lined oven tray.
Baking option 2: scoop batter into mini muffin tins, either lightly spraying the tins first with a neutral cooking oil, or lining them with mini cupcake cases.
** The first time I made these I went with option 1, the second time I went with option 2. It wasn’t until I actually typed up this post and went back to Heather’s site to reference and link her recipe that I realised she’d actually done the same thing and re-baked this recipe in mini muffin tins too haha good minds 😉
5. Bake for 10 minutes or until just golden on top.

These can be stored for almost a week in an airtight container… if they last that long.

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As you might be able to garner from the photo above, they’re super light and airy little cakes, with the yogurt keeping them moist and stopping them drying out after a day. They’re a great snack or “treat” and are super easy to customise to your own tastes – add nuts and seeds, fresh or frozen berries, dried fruit, chocolate chips, grated citrus rind, whatever you want!