A Quick Guide to Ameyoko Market, Tokyo

I last visited Tokyo back in 2015, and the post I wrote on the Ameyoko Market is comfortably the all-time most popular post I’ve written since starting this blog! I recently visited again (January 2018), this time with husband in tow, and thought I’d re-visit it on the blog again, too 🙂

Where is it?
First up, a clearer map. It can get a little confusing around the area it’s located, so hopefully this makes it a bit easier to navigate than my last map! I’ve marked below where I took the photo above, standing at that Y-shaped intersection where the road diverges into two. Those are your two main shopping streets, with others intersecting and cutting across them.

How do you get there?
Via subway – it’ll depend where you’re coming from, and you can use this nifty map to work it out, but the closest stations are Ueno-Hirokoji on the Ginza line, and Ueno-Okachimachi (literally across the road) on the Oedo line.

 

What should I shop for?
As I said in my previous post, everything from dried fish to nail polish. But there actually are a few things that are more popular:
– Golf gear: there are more than a dozen multi-level golf shops, selling clothes, shoes, clubs, bags, and even lessons.
Athletic wear and shoes: they’re an active bunch, so probably no surprise that you can find a lot of stores selling training gear (gym shoes, clothes, etc).
– Fish: fresh fish and dried fish, they’ve got it all. If you’re looking at taking some of the packaged, dried stuff home, best check if you’re actually allowed to take it through customs before you stock up!
– Packaged snacks: there are a couple of mega-stores absolutely full of snack foods. Chips chocolate and crackers and lollies in flavours you never imagined could exist.

Do you barter?
Honestly, I didn’t bother, for a few reasons:
a) The prices are already very reasonable.
b) Language barrier.
c) The Japanese are just so damn polite and likeable that I didn’t want to rip them off!

 

When is the best time to go?
Around 12pm is a good time to go – most of the stores should be open by then, but it’s not so hectic yet that you can’t walk around comfortably. Most casual eateries are already open and the restaurants are still getting ready for the lunch rush which is good, because you’ll want to have eat there.

What should I eat?
A sashimi bowl. I managed to find the same place I ate at last time I visited, and it’s still just as cheap and just as delicious! My bowl of fresh tuna, fatty tuna and salmon on sushi rice cost about AUD$10.00, and it was the best. You can’t beat fresh fish! If raw fish isn’t your jam, they cook up gyoza and tempura, too. Next door is an Osaka-style takoyaki stand if you fancy something a bit different. And then head back for a matcha soft serve.

Normally I’d say anywhere at the market is good for eating, but there are actually some really touristy places here I’d highly recommend steering clear of. General rule of thumb is if you walk past and someone walks after you waving a menu in your face and telling you that you must try their blah blah blah, don’t bother. If the food is good, they won’t chase you down to eat there!

How do I pay for stuff?
It’s a market – cash is king. If you’ve forgotten to bring some with you, just look for the green and blue Family Mart sign (they’re on every second corner), which should have an ATM inside.

 

When I’m done shopping, what else is there to do?
Head up to the Ueno Imperial Grant Park to walk off all that sashimi – it’s a short walk away, and the grounds are gorgeous. There are several pagodas and shrines on the grounds, museums, and even a zoo. And, if you time it right, cherry blossom trees!

Through my eyes: the streets of Shinjuku by night, Tokyo, Japan

We don’t indulge in many luxuries or extravagances at home; we buy our groceries at the market or homebrand at the supermarket. Majority of my clothes are from Target or KMart or items I’ve bought online at ASOS for 70% off. Our furtniture is far from designer. But one indulgence we do allow ourselves is our Foxtel subscription. Not so much for the reality rubbish marathons, but the BBC Knowledge and VICE docos, and the travel shows. It’s amazing how much of the world you can experience at least second hand from home!

Anyway, we spent an hour as hysterical as hyenas on the weekend watching a new show on channel 9, Travel Guides; “a new seven-part TV series where ordinary families are sent to review some of the most exotic and popular tourist locations around the globe. Six groups from all over Australia will travel to seven destinations and tell Australia what they truly thought of their holiday adventure. And it’s fair to say that not everyone’s idea of paradise is the same. Each group comes from a very different walk of life, and each holiday will suit a particular group’s taste.”

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They visited Tokyo in the first episode, and it was an absolute scream for me, having been there myself – seeing it through the eyes of other people so different to me was great, incredibly entertaining, and such a poignant (albeit sometimes not the most dignified) reminder that, with different backgrounds and experiences, we all see things so differently.

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I can’t wait to get back to Tokyo, though, and that episode got me even more excited. Looking back through some photos, I found these, all taken around the area I stayed in at night. It was gorgeous, fairly quiet, and I never once felt unsafe walking around alone. I can’t wait to get back!

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From my travel journal: Tokyo, 2015 (2)

Because it’s Friday, and I’m over working for the week, and my mind is on travel because we just booked an Airbnb for our time in Tokyo and I cannot wait to get back to that incredible city…

 

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“First up, walked to Yoyogi Park, which was really, really green and very beautiful. I wandered around for a while & eventually made my way to the Meiji-Jingu Shrine/Temple area – swarming with people, construction going on, still breath-taking. On our walking tour, Mika showed us a Shinto tradition at their shrines – you toss a coin into the receiving tray, bow twice, clap twice, make your prayer, then bow once more. I had the opportunity to do this again there alone, which was really nice…”

From my travel journal: Tokyo, 2015

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“We also saw some beautiful shrines, and even saw a wedding – absolutely breath-taking. Mika told us the two major religions here are Buddhism and Shinto, which I am interested in learning more about – it sounds like a really kind, spiritual, understanding kind of religion… Seeing one of the Shinto cemeteries was great, too – much like New Orleans, they bury many generations together (via cremation).”

Through my eyes: Shibuya Crossing, Tokyo, Japan

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I’m going to end the week with a short and sweet post; a look at Shibuya’s mental and world famous crossing. Because, honestly, that’s what my brain feels like right now!

Big thank you to the wonderful friend who recommended heading up to Starbucks for a better view of the mayhem – absolutely the best view you can find! And for a time-lapse view of the crossing in motion, click on through to my Instagram account 🙂

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Through my eyes: doorways of Tokyo

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Monday morning. Bleh. You’re meant to feel well rested and ready to take on the week on Monday mornings; as I type this on Sunday night, I know that’s probably not gonna be the case.

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The past few weeks have been a little stressful. Mum and dad have been travelling (yes, I’m one of those kids who worry about their parents). We had Christmas. A sibling struggling with her health. Trying to do the work of three people alone (in an unexpectedly busy period) while the others took annual leave. Adjusting to some new medication. A few migraines. Lots of social engagements. Health issues. A seemingly never ending to do list. And it all came to a head this week, the busiest one I’ve had in recent memory. I’m spent.

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After spending the morning on the road, checking out Anglesea’s Riverside Market, enjoying some tea in the sunshine, and celebrating my beautiful little niece’s birthday, the washing and dishes are now done, house tidied up, dinner (and lunch leftovers) cooked, and I’m kicking back with a pile of travel magazines by my side to flick through after I’ve written this.

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Following a (just) stifled anxiety attack earlier today, I got to thinking about the things that calm me. Reading, writing, scrolling through the Instagram feeds that inspire me, taking photographs, being in new places, visiting chaotic markets, travelling… Funny that an anxious introvert finds so much comfort in foreign, often busy places. I thought of the last trip, to Tokyo, which was so good for me.

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Walking around, alone, with just my camera and my thoughts was relaxing, therapeutic. And some of the photos I most enjoy taking when I’m travelling are of doorways.

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I love the idea that I have no idea what lies behind them; the possibilities of the stories contained within are endless. And, as the owner of a fairly active imagination, that fascinates me..

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But today, it’s Monday again. I’ve got home made okonomiyaki for lunch and 73 sleeps until my next adventure. Sometimes busy gets uncomfortable, but that’s what life is all about. It’s about being busy and uncomfortable and stressed and overwhelmed, but also about the opportunity to learn and imagine and discover, to find your own peace and joy in amongst the mayhem. And I’m grateful for the chance to prove myself worthy of it every morning 🙂 Happy Monday! xo

Stay here: IBIS Tokyo Shinjuku, Japan

Last stop in this week’s whirlwind trip around the world; I found out at the Japanese Film Festival that Australian tourism to Japan has risen by around 20% over the last year or so, and when I thought about it, I realised I’m hearing about a lot more people travelling there now, so I thought this might be a good post to end the week on!

 

IBIS Tokyo Shinjuku
7-10-5 Nishi Shinjuku, Tokyo
http://www.ibis.com/gb/hotel-8620-ibis-tokyo-shinjuku/index.shtml

When it comes to accommodation, Tokyo isn’t the cheapest city to visit. Similarly to Europe, rooms have the reputation for being on the small side, and, like Melbourne, they come with a decent price tag.

After a bit of research, I found the Ibis in Shinjuku, which was pretty reasonably priced compared to similar alternatives at just under $1000 for 9 nights.

I arrived to a pretty modern foyer staffed by an incredibly friendly and helpful team. They had me checked in within a few minutes, and apologised for the renovations that were taking place. Half of Shinjuku seemed to be under construction during our visit, and I was assured that work would only be taking place strictly between 9am and 5pm so as to minimise any disruptions to guests.

As you can see above, my single room was pretty small – a king single took up most of the space, with my suitcase just fitting lengthways in the space between the end of the bed and the bar fridge. About three end-to-end footsteps were all that fit between the bed and wall. The bathroom was similarly small:

But space aside, I couldn’t have been happier with my temporary home, and it did instantly feel like home! Big positives about this property:
– free WiFi (duh)
– 24 hour front desk with staff who speak English
– restaurant on site for breakfast, lunch and dinner, should you need a quick and easy option
– super comfy bed
– hair dryer
– robe and slippers (wore these EVERY DAY!! Loved them!! haha)
– small bar fridge in room
– kettle
– TV with option to purchase extra channels
– complimentary Shiseido shampoo, conditioner and body wash
– air conditioning
– on site parking
– option between smoking and non-smoking rooms
– across the street is a Family Mart (mini convenience store)
– on the same street are a McDonalds and a Cafe Veloce, both of which open for breakfast/early morning tea and coffee (these are few and far between!)
– only a few minutes walk to Shinjuku station

While the room was small, it was surprisingly comfortable! The smiles and greetings each time I left and returned made it feel instantly homely, the room itself was very clean, and little things like having a kettle and fridge made an enormous difference to my stay. The location was incomparable as well; a few minutes from one of the biggest stations on the city, a heap of shopping malls, and beautiful parks in most directions, not to mention super safe – not once walking home from the station in the dark at night did I feel scared for my safety or well being.

The team at the front desk were also super helpful in terms of helping me with directions, and even getting me to an authorised seller for my Disneyland ticket! They had maps and public transport directions printed out and ready to go, and were genuinely more than happy to help with anything I needed. You just cannot underestimate how important and comforting that is, particularly when you’re travelling solo in a country where English isn’t widely spoken.

If you’ve read along here for a while and seen some of my other posts relating to accommodation (like the pub at Warburton that I prefer over the B&Bs), you’ll know I’m no princess when I travel. I don’t need a magazine-perfect resort, a king size bed, luxurious surrounds. I’m not travelling to enjoy time in my room. I need helpful staff, a comfy bed and a clean and functioning bathroom. A fridge for fruit and water, and a kettle with which to make my tea is a bonus. I got all that and more at the Ibis, and if you’re another traveller who’d rather spend your cash on the experiences instead of the sleep space, I’d highly recommend it for your trip to Tokyo!